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Members Area Tutorial: Design a Grungy Rock Poster Using a Non-Destructive Workflow

Final Image

Here is a preview of the image that we are going to be creating:

Step 1

Start by creating a new document (600X650px). Paste in your Wrinkled Paper texture. Reduce this layer’s opacity to 18% for a subtle texture background.

Step 2

The saturation is looking a bit intense on this texture, so I apply a hue/saturation adjustment layer. Be sure to apply a clipping mask to your adjustment layers, so that they only effect the layer directly beneath them. To apply your clipping mask go to layer>create clipping mask.

Hue/Saturation Adjustment Layer Settings:

Hue: 0
Saturation: -60
Lightness: 0

Step 3

Download the Grunged texture pack in the resources for this tutorial.

Paste in one of the textures. Then change this layer’s blend mode to ‘overlay’.

Apply a hue/saturation adjustment layer (and clipping mask), and reduce the saturation of your grunged texture layer to -100.

Step 4

Now download your watercolor brush set. Apply several of the brushes on a new layer called ‘watercolor brushes’. Use a 100% opacity black paintbrush.

A neat trick to add more variation to your brush marks is to apply a gradient overlay blending option to your brush layer.

Gradient Overlay Blending Option:

Blend Mode: Overlay
Opacity: 50%
Gradient: ffffff to 000000
Style: Radial
Angle: 90

Then change the layer opacity to 60%, and reduce the layer fill opacity to 35%.

Step 5

Now download your paint splatter image, and paste it into a new document. Go to select>color range and use your eye dropper to click on the black splatter shape. You’ll see in your selection preview that all black parts of your image will be selected (in this case your paint splatter).

Paste your selected paint splatter into your original document, and then change this layer’s opacity to ‘overlay’.

Step 6

Use your custom shape tool to create a series of black arrows across the top of your canvas.

Place them fairly tightly together, and then rasterize each of these layers and merge them down to a single layer called ‘pattern arrows’.

Now apply a pattern overlay blending option to your layer. I used a pattern from SquidFingers.com. I also used the ‘luminosity’ blend mode in order to desaturate my pattern.

Pattern Overlay Blending Option:

Blend Mode: Luminosity
Opacity: 100%
Pattern: (squidfingers pattern – use whatever pattern you wish though)
Scale: 100%

Finally, reduce the opacity of your arrows layer to 40%. This adds a nice subtle patterned area in the top of your canvas:

Step 7

Now download the halftone patterns pack found in the resources to this tutorial.

Paste in one of the patterns and position it into the top left of your canvas. Then reduce this layer’s opacity to 35%, and change it’s blend mode to ‘overlay’.

Paste in several more halftone patterns. Then experiment by reducing the opacities of each shape. You want to put the opacity at between 20-50%, and use a variety of ‘multiply’ and ‘overlay’ layer blend modes.

Step 8

Now cut out and paste in the image of your business man sitting down.

Add a layer mask to this layer, and use a 100% opacity black paintbrush to mask off the top of your man’s head.

Then use a 20% opacity black paintbrush (using your watercolor brush set) to mask off parts of the man’s body. However, because you’re using a low opacity masking brush, it won’t hide these areas compeltely, but simply give them a washed out grungy effect:

Step 9

Now apply a hue/saturation and levels adjustment layer, giving each adjustment layer a clipping mask so that they only effect your business man layer:

Hue/Saturation Adjustment Layer:

Hue: 0
Saturation: -100
Lightness: 0

Levels Adjustment Layer:

73 / 1.13 / 201

Step 10

Now download the vector pack from the resources for this tutorial.

Copy and paste in the bear head, positioning it over the head of your man.

Now apply a hue/saturation and levels adjustment layer, giving each adjustment layer a clipping mask:

Hue/Saturation Adjustment Layer Settings:

Hue: 0
Saturation: -100
Lightness: 0

Levels Adjustment Layer Settings:

40 / 0.69 / 232

Step 11

Now paste in the scroll from your vector pack, positioning it at the base of your businessman.

Drop Shadow Settings:

Blend Mode: Multiply
Color: 000000
Opacity: 30%
Angle: 120
Distance: 5px
Spread: 0%
Size: 5px

Step 12

Now paste in the birds from your vector pack, positioning them on the ends of your scroll:

Step 13

Now use your path tool to create a curved path following the curve of your scroll shape.

Select your type tool, and click on your path. Then you should be able to add some text that follows this curve, fitting the shape of your scroll:

Now add some more text beneath your scroll. You can see the text settings below:

Scroll Text Settings:

Font Face: Bebas
Size: 30pt
Kerning: -50
Color: 000000

Larger Text Settings:

Font Face: Bebas
Size: 60pt
Kerning: -50
Color: 000000

Finally, apply a layer mask to each text layer. Use a low opacity, watercolor black paintbrush to brush over parts of your text, giving it a faded, grungy appearance:

Step 14

Now we want to give a cool rounded border to our composition.

Start by creating a rounded rectangle shape that has a gap of around 10px between it and the edge of your canvas. This can be any color you want, but I used red to make the effect clearer.

Now apply a black stroke blending option to this layer. This stroke will act as the border effect:

Stroke Blending Option Settings:

Size: 15px
Position: outside
Blend Mode: Normal
Opacity: 100%
Color: 000000

Now reduce the ‘fill opacity’ of this layer to 0% (hiding your red rounded rectangle and leaving only your stroke). Then reduce the overall layer opacity to 40%, making your stroke border semi-transparent:

Step 15

Now paste in your guitar images from the resources for this tutorial.

Cut them out using whatever method your prefer, and then go to edit>transform>rotate. Rotate them to fit nicely into your composition.

Reduce the opacity of each layer to 30% and change the blend mode to ‘multiply’.

Step 16

Now create a new layer called ‘circle’. Create a large circular selection that exceeds the edges of your canvas. Fill this will black.

Now with your selection still in place, go to select>modify>contract. Contract your selection by 60px. Because of the fact that your selection exceeds the edges of your canvas, your circle won’t contract in a normal way, and rather than forming a perfect ring, you’ll be left with a cool abstract shape like the image below:

Now reduce this layer’s opacity to 30%

Step 17

Now I want to create a non-destructive lens flare effect.

To do this, create a new layer called ‘lens flare’. Fill your canvas with black.

Then change this layer’s blend mode to ‘screen’ and reduce it’s opacity to 80%. By choosing a ‘screen’ blend mode the black fill for this layer will be hidden, yet you can still apply a visible lens flare.

Go to filter>render>lens flare and render a 50-300mm Zoom lens flare (Brightness: 100%).

Our lens flare is looking a little too saturated, so apply a hue/saturation adjustment layer. We won’t want to completely desaturate our lens flare layer, so reduce the saturation to -75. Remember to apply a clipping mask to your adjustment layer so that your adjustments only effect the underlying layer.

Step 18

Now create a new layer called ‘dodge/burn’. We’ll now proceed to dodge/burn our image in a non-destructive way.

Start by going to edit>fill and fill your layer with 50% gray. Then change this layer’s blend mode to ‘overlay’. This will hide your 50% gray fill, but will let you paint over your image using black/white or colored brush marks. Use a soft paintbrush and use black to enhance the shadows of your image. Then switch to a soft, white paintbrush and paint over your highlights. Remember to keep this step fairly subtle, as you want your image to look natural. Your dodge/burn brush should be around 10-20% opacity at most.

The images below show your dodge/burn layer at ‘normal’ blend mode and then ‘overlay’ blend mode.

Step 19

Finally, apply a default rainbow gradient overlay adjustment layer. Don’t use a clipping mask for this final adjustment layer, as you want it to effect your entire canvas. Set this layer’s opacity to 5%, to just give a subtle tint of color:

And We’re Done!

You can view the final outcome below. I hope that you enjoyed this tutorial and would love to hear your feedback on the techniques and outcome.

VIP Download

Download the original .psd file for this tutorial here:

DOWNLOAD .PSD FILE

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